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Cracking the CA code

SHE LIVES OUT of a 300 square feet room in Mumbai along with 3 family members. Her dad drives an auto-rickshaw for a living and earns Rs 15,000 a month. So whats so special about the lady, Prema Jayakumar? Well, she has topped the all-India Chartered Accountancy exam with a stunning total of 607 ou

Cracking the CA code
SHE LIVES OUT of a 300 square feet room in Mumbai along with 3 family members. Her dad drives an auto-rickshaw for a living and earns Rs 15,000 a month. So what’s so special about the lady, Prema Jayakumar? Well, she has topped the all-India Chartered Accountancy exam with a stunning total of 607 out of 800. Thanks to the national media she has rightfully attracted nation wide attention for her extraordinary performance. She clearly symbolises the spirit of “Yes We Can.”

And there were others...

There have been others in the past who have shown similar grit.

A lady, at the age of 42, on the untimely death of her young husband, decided to do CA. 4 years later she qualified at the age of 46, Padma Harirangan. This, mark it, happened in the 1980s.

A young lad, going 95 per cent visually challenged, underwent Internship in Chennai, attended classes like any other soul, did his reading with the help of a computer and wrote his exams with the aid of a scribe to qualify in 2006 as a CA. Today, he works with the Reserve Bank of India in Hyderabad. That’s a clear victory of mind over matter, B Jairam.

Imagine someone having cerebral palsy. This is an umbrella term that refers to physical disability in human development. Its closest cousin is spastics. It has no cure. Imagine such a person wanting to do CA. We would have laughed our heads off. Even to the best of brains CA is a challenging course. Yet a person born with such cerebral palsy cleared the CA exam in June 2009. Meet the 27-year-old Ajit Shekawath.

He lived out of a 12x25 room in a ghetto with a family of five; born to a housemaid mother and a textile loom worker father. He himself worked as an office boy and rode 7 km to office for work. But none of this stopped Shailesh Ghule from emerging as a chartered accountant. Indeed, a classic case of rising above poverty to compete with those who are materially well off.

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