Ad Here  
May
June
July
August
September
October
 
 
Global auto hub TVS Motor revs up for market share drive HMIL helped India emerge a large car exporter... Signs of recovery Baleno: Maruti’s new offering in the hatchback range High ownership costs depress demand… TVS Motor in Central America with local partner We’re prepared for the change - Vinod Dasari WIL, Japanese Topy form JV for car wheels M & M sets global ambitions in farm machinery Indigenously developed technology for AL’s BS-4 vehicles The best fit for “Make in India” Global auto technology Congress in Chennai To shift to top gear In top gear Double standards continue... The electronic car – will it kill the IC engine? Renault unveils ‘game-changer’ Kwid Red signals for diesel vehicles in Delhi Tata Motors launches AMT buses Rane Group achieves Rs.4032 crore topline in FY17
 
Global auto technology Congress in Chennai
With a production of 45 lakh vehicles, India is the fifth largest producer of automobiles. Global leaders have set up manufacturing facilities in India. A recognition of India’s stature is evidenced by FISITA, the International network of over 200,000 automotive engineers in 37 countries and the Society of Automotive Engineers planning to organise the FISITA 2018 Congress.

FISITA has been holding the biannual congress in deve-loped countries that for long alternated between America and Europe, later extended to Japan, China and South Korea. This is the first time India will be hosting the meet.  The importance of the conference was in evidence by Dr Pawan Goenka, managing director, Mahindra and Mahindra, along with leading lights of SAE India, Aravind Bharadwaj and N Balasubramanian, addressing the media 18 months ahead!

 

Focus on innovation, technology...

Goenka said “for 70 years FISITA World Automotive Congress has been a forum for industry experts, engineers and executives to exchange ideas and discuss trends that will drive the automotive industry forward. Globally, the auto industry is going through a period of disruption where new technologies and newer business models are adopted that can potentially disrupt the existing order. The age of connectivity, shared mobility and electrification is upon us. By bringing toge-

ther global experts, FISITA is offering us the right platform to look into the future, which will be all about affordable and sustainable mobility.”

Goenka referred the recent efforts in the west to concepts such as driverless vehicles. “Such an idea may be difficult in Indian chaotic road conditions, but soon the industry will catch up with such advances,” he added. 

 

Increasing R&D spend

Goenka referred to the impressive “expansion of the auto industry but pointed to the need to focus on innovation through technology.” When I pointed to the modest commitment of Indian industry to R&D, Goenka said that the situation had changed substantially since 2000. He pointed to the experience of his company: “in 2002 M&M spent one per cent of its revenues on R&D. This has increased since to 4.5 per cent in 2016; factoring revenue growth tenfold, R&D spend has expanded to a factor of 30 over these 15 years.” 

Another welcome feature is large automobile companies setting up large research centres: M&M employs over 2500 at its research centre at the Mahindra World City. Leyland has a 2000 plus strong research centre in Chennai. The huge success of Renault’s small car, Kwid, launched with a very high indigenous content of 97 per cent, was the product of joint research by France, Korea, and India. Add to these the success of R&D at TVS Motors, BMW, Daimler Bharat, Enfield India, Ford, Hyundai...

Dr. Aravind Bharadwaj, Chairman FISITA 2018 steering committee, expressed happiness over SAE India succeeding in getting the conference from developed countries to India. Chairman FISITA 2018 organising committee, N Balasubramanian, said over 500 research papers in current and emerging technologies would be presented at the Congress and over 150 companies across the globe would showcase the technology products in the exhibition at the Chennai Trade Centre. 

 

Why Chennai? 

Goenka pointed to the several attractive features of Chennai like world-class convention centres, easy availability of hotel accommodation at affordable prices, the large presence of OEMs, full-service suppliers, technology hubs, test track and, above all, modest costs as among Chennai’s attractions. 

The state government should capitalise on this mega conference and provide the delegates the several attractions for investments. - SV

Author :
Reported On :
Sector :
Shoulder :
RELATED NEWS
ABOUT IE
IE, the business magazine from south was launched in 1968 and pioneered business journalism in south. Through the 45 years IE has been focusing on well-presented and well-researched articles. When giants in the industry stumbled to keep pace with the digital revolution, IE stayed affixed embracing technology.
Read more
 
PRIVACY POLICY
Economist Communications Ltd is committed to ensuring that your privacy is protected.
Read more
TERMS AND CONDITIONS
You agree that your use of this Website and the purchase of the magazine will be governed by these terms and conditions.
Read more
 
CONTACT US
S-15, Industrial Estate,
Guindy,
Chennai - 600 032.
PHONE: +91 44 22501236
EMAIL: indecom1968@gmail.com